Better than paper: Teachers use creative hall passes

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Better than paper: Teachers use creative hall passes

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APs lurking, JROTC officers snooping and teachers on the lookout are all roadblocks and obstacles in our paths when trying to make a quick journey to the bathroom. The only things that gets students around these roadblocks are hall passes. For some students, asking for the hall pass means asking for odd things like a giant marker, a plastic lobster or a piece of lumber.

Hall passes are often pieces of art, but occasionally, teachers send traditional pieces of paper with a sign sheet. A lot of teachers express themselves through hall passes, and even make them funny at times. For Spanish teacher Mrs. Villarreal, being unique was made simple and easy. For quite a while, she used a plain paper plate.

“The first time I used a plate was because it was accessible,” Sandra Villareal said. “It works for me. The students don’t seem to mind.”

Often times, teachers try to be unique and choose something that makes going to the bathroom interesting. Calculus teacher Sara Kamphaus came up with the idea to make students write a fun fact on the pass before they left because students never wrote their name on the pass.

“I find that students many times did not write their name on the pass when they took it with them, so I started having them write their favorite color, animal, movie, song, actor, etc,” Kamphaus said. “I find that they almost always write their name on the pass before they leave, as well as their favorite choice.”

Art teacher Jessica Louviere has also gone for the unique road in choosing a hall pass. One of her first hall passes was a plastic lobster.

“At first students looked at me like I was crazy,” Jessica Louviere said.  “When I handed them the lobster, they just laughed,”

Teachers and students alike enjoy carrying and signing unique hall passes. They allow teachers to express themselves, and students to carry odd things to get around APs and other teachers. They’re fun, and they stand out.

“I enjoy having silly passes,” Louviere said. “Sometimes you just need a laugh during our hectic school day.

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