Positive message posters shine bright like diamonds in the sky across halls

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Kaitlyn Devitt

This poster was designed by Zach Etzkorn, Alec Yaagoub, Martin Kowalczek, & Spencer Albrecht.

By Kaitlyn Devitt, Lemont High School

Correction: An original version of this article inaccurately stated the posters were created by the Digital Art course.  The article has been updated to reflect the correct course: Graphic Design.  The Tom-Tom staff regrets the error.

If you’ve taken a stroll across the halls  recently, you’ve surely noticed the newfound presence of cartoon graphic posters with positive messages popping up all throughout the school. These posters are the work of Megan Idell’s Graphic Design students and each design was created originally by the students she teaches.

The posters can be found all the way from the first to the third floor, with multiple decorating each level to give the whole school an extra dose of positivity. Since their debut in the halls, many students have commented on the shift in the environment the posters have created.

Senior Annemarie Bacon said, “They make the atmosphere more fun and friendly.”

Kaitlyn Devitt

Idell first got the idea to begin this project after being inspired by the positive message murals created by street artist Jason Naylor.

“Dealing with everything of the last year and a half with COVID, I thought it would be a really good opportunity and time to try and do a positive message mural,” Idell said regarding the posters.

This poster was created by sophomore Cael Whitchurch. (Kaitlyn Devitt)

She has even noted that in the time since the posters have gone up, students have made a point to reach out to her to comment on them. Idell said that one student  stopped her to say that she loved the murals and that they just brighten up the school.

The digital art classes where these were produced are available for all grades to sign up and participate in, giving everyone in the school a chance to share their artwork in the community.

  “It’s cool to see how an idea you have can come to life,” Medina added,  “[The posters] add something to look forward to in the halls.” ”

— Julian Medina

For sophomore Julian Medina, this is his first art class in high school.

“It’s cool to see how an idea you have can come to life,” Medina added,  “[The posters] add something to look forward to in the halls.”

This poster is a collaboration of the work of Alyssa Tenuta, Zoe Austin & Jason McKeough. (Kaitlyn Devitt)

Idell’s classes began working on the murals in September of this year and started posting them around the school on Nov. 2. She dove into the assignment by first gathering quotes to use generated by the United Against Bullying Club, although students were given the option to come up with their own. Students were also granted full creative liberty with their designs as well as being able to pick which phrase to use in their art.

“Mrs. Idell gave me suggestions of what I should change and with a combination of my own ideas I changed the design a ton throughout the process, but I never felt bored or demotivated during any of it,” senior Joey Spadafora said regarding the two posters he helped to design. “It feels amazing knowing something I created has helped change the atmosphere of my entire school.”

This mural was created solely by Joey Spadafora and can be found on the third floor. (Kaitlyn Devitt)

This project was welcomed by digital art students as the murals’ production was solely the responsibility of the class.

Idell asked students to submit proposals “to present them to the class, of the mural [sketch], location, and why.”

This left a lot of opportunity for creativity which shows clearly when observing the various styles of the posters.

“I had a lot of fun making them and working with the other students,” senior Natalie Barowsky. “I like how it makes the school a little brighter.”

Projects like these show the value a kind word can make in someone’s life, and the impact a few posters can make to cheer up a high school’s decor.

This mural was the combined effort of Natalie Barowsky, Pauline Lin, and Olivia Potoczak. (Kaitlyn Devitt)

This story was originally published on The Tom-Tom on November 22, 2021.