The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

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The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

Best of SNO

The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

Best of SNO

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Redhawks make their mark during Women’s History Month

For some fans of basketball, there isn’t a difference between men’s and women’s basketball.

But when it comes to revenue and popularity, the difference is major. 

According to the World Sports Network, in 2022 the NBA had an average crowd of more than 20,000 people per home game. 

Setting history at the start of Women’s History Month just makes it even more special,

— sophomore Lilian Johnson

On the other hand, the game attendance for the WNBA had approximately 10,000 fans for each of their home games.

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But one of the things that makes the WNBA so special is its diversity compared to the NBA. With players from over 53 different countries, the WNBA has seen high participation from people all over the world.

The WNBA has had many achievements since its creation in 1996 and some Redhawks on campus are following in their footsteps.

“I feel like it means a lot to this school,” varsity basketball player, sophomore Jacy Abii said. “Especially that it’s like making history for not only our school, but our district, too. Going back to back. But it just means a lot. Isn’t saying that, like, you know, we’re setting an expectation and we’re just setting a bar that’s like really high for our school and our district and everybody else watching us.”

What made this experience even more special for the team was the recognition shown throughout campus and being able to have a back-to-back state title at the end of Black History Month and the start of Women’s History Month.

“We played the last day on Black History Month, obviously that history is not that long ago,” head coach Ross Reedy said. “In fact, it’s ongoing, and represents so many of the kids that we have and that have opportunities day and to also be coming into Women’s History Month. You know, it’s that is kind of a special kind of couple of days.” 

To Reedy, the recognition gained from the girls’ success on the court is only growing.

“I’m glad for our girls, I’m glad for our game because it’s increasing in popularity,” Reedy said. “NCAA basketball, even WNBA basketball is kind of on the uptick. And so I’m just really proud that whatever small part that our kids get to play in that it gets recognized and that they get to do it because our kids are really doing their best. Hopefully people see what they’ve accomplished is special.”

This achievement being at the beginning of Women’s History Month creates a different feeling and a feeling that many players on the team will feel after this moment in history.

“Setting history at the start of Women’s History Month just makes it even more special,” varsity girls’ basketball player, sophomore Lilian Johnson said. “And hopefully more people will notice and pay attention to, like, all the amazing things that women in sports are doing and that they’ll get highlighted and recognized even more.”

My dad has a coworker that he talked to and she said that she loves seeing women empowerment and us winning state again,

— junior Kathryn Murphy

The girls’ success is recognized on and off campus.

“It feels good,” varsity girls’ basketball player, junior Kathryn Murphy said. “My dad has a coworker that he talked to and she said that she loves seeing women empowerment and us winning state again.”

Women empowerment can be seen throughout this experience again and again and for varsity girls basketball player, senior Judith Aluga, wins like these help continue to empower future generations of women.

“I feel like it’ll be a good example for our younger generation, especially because I don’t think of, this has never been done before, especially by a girls’ basketball team,” Aluga said. “And I know, a lot more attention goes to the men’s sports over girls, so I just think we’ll help empower the younger generation of women.”

This story was originally published on Wingspan on March 18, 2024.