The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

Best of SNO

The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

Best of SNO

The best stories being published on the SNO Sites network

Best of SNO

Best of SNO Stats
1989
Published
Stories
560
Participating
Schools
322
Published
Schools
Publication Tips
We'll be the first to admit that getting your story published on Best of SNO is hard. We receive over 100 submissions per day, and only about 15 percent are selected for publication.

There are multiple factors that come into play when deciding if a story is Best of SNO-worthy. From engaging writing and unique angles to well thought out multimedia elements, more considerations are made than it might look.

If you're having a hard time achieving that Best of SNO distinction, check out our past newsletters to get a better idea of the type of content we're looking for.
March 21, 2024
January 26, 2024
November 16, 2023
March 1, 2023
January 10, 2023
November 1, 2022

Opinion: More than just a girl

In+a+male-dominated+world%2C+women+have+always+been+standing+in+the+shadows+of+success%2C+overlooked+and+underestimated+by+others.+Whether+it%E2%80%99s+how+they+dress%2C+act+or+present+themselves%2C+every+action+and+word+is+critiqued.
Madeline Rivera
In a male-dominated world, women have always been standing in the shadows of success, overlooked and underestimated by others. Whether it’s how they dress, act or present themselves, every action and word is critiqued.

I remember it all too well. The pointing, the disgusted looks, the whispers – all from those whom it hardly concerned.

It was sixth grade – my most awkward year – and I had worn my first bra to school. It was my first “big girl” bra. I was so excited. I even picked out the color, nothing too raunchy because my mother had to approve. I felt as if I was finally becoming a real woman – just like my mother, my grandmother and the women before them. 

However, the light colored fabric was visible through my uniform’s shirt. My classmates, particularly the male ones, were made aware of what I was wearing: a piece of clothing normal for any girl to wear. I expected my classmates to think I was “mature” and “cool.” Instead, I was met with snide, vulgar insults that all had the same connotation – I was being “too risque” for wearing such a thing to school, according to sixth grade standards and their boyish mindsets.

This was the earliest account of misogyny I experienced, at just 12 years old, from my own peers. Now, at 18, I carry that humiliating experience with me, despite it being so long ago. 

Story continues below advertisement

That same unpleasant feeling came back while watching the 81st Golden Globes Awards with my mother a few weeks ago. I expected a glamorous award show with our favorite films of the year sweeping the categories, paired with comical jokes from the host. Instead, the show’s host, comedian Jo Koy, created an entire monologue based on tone deaf jokes and subtle misogyny, most notably insulting women such as singer Taylor Swift, director Greta Gerwig and actress Margot Robbie, all of whom were nominated for a Golden Globe in respective categories.

Swift was targeted for her appearances in the stands at her boyfriend, Travis Kelce’s, football games. Media began to swarm her at games, obsessing over the couple’s private life and debating whether she would be present at future games or not – completely unwarranted by Swift. Meanwhile, Gerwig directed and wrote “Barbie,” which became the biggest debut ever for a film directed by a woman. The movie was centered around womanhood and struggling with femininity in a male-dominated world. While the movie received praise for its meaningful message, others felt it was “anti-man” or too “woke.” Koy only fueled the fire for those misogynistic critics with his careless monologue.

Instead of taking accountability for his actions and words after the show received poor reception, Koy insisted the jokes fell flat due to the writing team not being assembled until eight days before the ceremony. He went on to say that he met with them for the first time the day before the monologue was supposed to be turned in, and made the final product that day without further review.

Social media users know the script all too well. A person “apologizes” for their harmful actions, which, nine times out of 10, is a blatant excuse. Then, social media has a frenzy about how absurd their reasoning was, and life moves on. Like all drama, it becomes old news, overtaken by bigger, juicier “gossip.” 

However, it isn’t old news – at least, not for women. Misogyny is still present in our lives, whether it is subtle or flagrant. Whether it be from men or fellow women, it is consistently present, even in the modern, progressive society we live in today. My experience as a child is one of the many I unfortunately had to deal with simply because of my gender – something I have no control over.

The Golden Globes incident was a public example of misogyny; however, not all of them are so public, often occurring behind closed doors in the workplace, education system and society as a whole. Snide remarks, jokes, stereotypes and harassment – misogyny is misogyny, just presented in different variations. Without the innovative minds of women such as author Jane Austen, nurse Florence Nightingale or civil rights activist Rosa Parks, history would be much different.

Just this past weekend alone at The 66th Annual Grammy Awards, seven out of the eight nominees for Record of the Year and Album of the Year were women. Both of which were won, respectively, by Miley Cyrus and Taylor Swift. Women are more than mothers, wives and sisters – they are leaders, innovators and pioneers. 

In a male-dominated world, women have always been standing in the shadows of success, overlooked and underestimated by others. Whether it be how they dress, act or present themselves, every action and word is critiqued. Even in the year 2024, that sentiment still remains. 

Society needs to take a step back and acknowledge how much women truly bring to the table. Women are more than just the butt of a joke in a comedic monologue; they are essential to the world.

This story was originally published on The Hawk Eye on February 8, 2024.